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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Kathryn B.*
dc.contributor.authorTerbeck, S.*
dc.contributor.authorBriazu, R.A.*
dc.contributor.authorHaines, A.*
dc.contributor.authorGummerum, M.*
dc.contributor.authorGanis, G.*
dc.contributor.authorHoward, I.S.*
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-03T13:28:16Z
dc.date.available2019-06-03T13:28:16Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-24
dc.identifier.citationFrancis KB, Terbeck S, Briazu RA et al (2017) Simulating moral actions: An investigation of personal force in virtual moral dilemmas. Scientific Reports. 7: Article number 13954.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17102
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractAdvances in Virtual Reality (VR) technologies allow the investigation of simulated moral actions in visually immersive environments. Using a robotic manipulandum and an interactive sculpture, we now also incorporate realistic haptic feedback into virtual moral simulations. In two experiments, we found that participants responded with greater utilitarian actions in virtual and haptic environments when compared to traditional questionnaire assessments of moral judgments. In experiment one, when incorporating a robotic manipulandum, we found that the physical power of simulated utilitarian responses (calculated as the product of force and speed) was predicted by individual levels of psychopathy. In experiment two, which integrated an interactive and life-like sculpture of a human into a VR simulation, greater utilitarian actions continued to be observed. Together, these results support a disparity between simulated moral action and moral judgment. Overall this research combines state-of-the-art virtual reality, robotic movement simulations, and realistic human sculptures, to enhance moral paradigms that are often contextually impoverished. As such, this combination provides a better assessment of simulated moral action, and illustrates the embodied nature of morally-relevant actions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPlymouth University and Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN-604764)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-13909-9en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectMoral judgmenten_US
dc.subjectMoral actionen_US
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen_US
dc.subjectJudgment-behaviour discrepancyen_US
dc.subjectMoral dilemmasen_US
dc.subjectHaptic feedbacken_US
dc.subjectPersonal forceen_US
dc.subjectPsychopathyen_US
dc.titleSimulating moral actions: An investigation of personal force in virtual moral dilemmasen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2017-09-29
dc.date.application2017-10-24
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-03T13:28:53Z


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