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dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Catherine*
dc.contributor.authorJones, I.R.*
dc.contributor.authorMartyr, A.*
dc.contributor.authorNelis, S.M.*
dc.contributor.authorMorris, R.G.*
dc.contributor.authorClare, L.*
dc.contributor.authorIDEAL Study Team*
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-09T11:31:56Z
dc.date.available2019-05-09T11:31:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationQuinn C, Jones IR, Martyr A et al (2019) Caregivers' beliefs about dementia: findings from the IDEAL study. Psychology & Health. 34(10): 1214-1230.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17037
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: Informal caregivers of people with dementia develop their own beliefs about the condition, referred to as Dementia Representations (DRs), as they try to make sense of the changes they are observing. The first aim of this study was to provide a profile of the types of DRs held by caregivers. The second aim was to examine the impact of caregivers’ DRs on their well-being, satisfaction with life (SwL) and caregiving stress. Methods: Participants were 1264 informal caregivers of people in the mild-to-moderate stages of dementia from time-point 1 of the IDEAL cohort study. Measures: DRs were measured using questionnaire items covering: Identity, Cause, Control, and Timeline. Results: Almost half (49.2%) of caregivers used a diagnostic term to describe the person’s condition, although 93.4% of caregivers stated they were aware of the diagnosis. Higher well-being, SwL, and lower caregiving stress were associated with the use of an identity term relating to specific symptoms of dementia, attributing the cause to ageing or not knowing the cause, and believing the condition would stay the same. Lower well-being, SwL, and higher caregiving stress were associated with believing there was little that could be done to control the effects of the condition. Conclusion: Healthcare professionals should assess and gain an understanding of caregivers’ DRs in order to provide more tailored information and support.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe IDEAL study is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (UK) and the National Institute for Health Research (UK) through grant ES/L001853/2 ‘Improving the experience of dementia and enhancing active life: living well with dementia’.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2019.1597098en_US
dc.rights(c) 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.subjectCaregiveren_US
dc.subjectCommon Sense Modelen_US
dc.subjectDementiaen_US
dc.subjectDiagnosisen_US
dc.subjectIllness representationen_US
dc.titleCaregivers' beliefs about dementia: findings from the IDEAL studyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019-03-12
dc.date.application2019-04-22
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-05-09T11:31:56Z


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