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dc.contributor.authorAskew, G.N.*
dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, L.A.*
dc.contributor.authorMinetti, A.E.*
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, John*
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-20T11:08:14Z
dc.date.available2019-03-20T11:08:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.identifier.citationAskew GN, McFarlane LA, Minetti AE et al (2019) Energy cost of ambulation in trans-tibial amputees using a dynamic-response foot with hydraulic versus rigid 'ankle': insights from body centre of mass dynamics. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation. 16:39.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16902
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Previous research has shown that use of a dynamic-response prosthetic foot (DRF) that incorporates a small passive hydraulic ankle device (hyA-F), provides certain biomechanical benefits over using a DRF that has no ankle mechanism (rigA-F). This study investigated whether use of a hyA-F in unilateral trans-tibial amputees (UTA) additionally provides metabolic energy expenditure savings and increases the symmetry in walking kinematics, compared to rigA-F. Methods Nine active UTA completed treadmill walking trials at zero gradient (at 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 of customary walking speed) and for customary walking speed only, at two angles of decline (5° and 10°). The metabolic cost of locomotion was determined using respirometry. To gain insights into the source of any metabolic savings, 3D motion capture was used to determine segment kinematics, allowing body centre of mass dynamics (BCoM), differences in inter-limb symmetry and potential for energy recovery through pendulum-like motion to be quantified for each foot type. Results During both level and decline walking, use of a hyA-F compared to rigA-F significantly reduced the total mechanical work and increased the interchange between the mechanical energies of the BCoM (recovery index), leading to a significant reduction in the metabolic energy cost of locomotion, and hence an associated increase in locomotor efficiency (p < 0.001). It also increased inter-limb symmetry (medio-lateral and progression axes, particularly when walking on a 10° decline), highlighting the improvements in gait were related to a lessening of the kinematic compensations evident when using the rigA-F. Conclusions Findings suggest that use of a DRF that incorporates a small passive hydraulic ankle device will deliver improvements in metabolic energy expenditure and kinematics and thus should provide clinically meaningful benefits to UTAs’ everyday locomotion, particularly for those who are able to walk at a range of speeds and over different terrains.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council(EPSRC, reference EP/H010491/1).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2019. Open Access: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, andreproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link tothe Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver(http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.subjectDynamic-response prosthetic foot (DRF)en_US
dc.subjectAnkle mechanismen_US
dc.subjectSmall passive hydraulic ankle deviceen_US
dc.subjectTrans-tibial amputeesen_US
dc.subjectMetabolic energy expenditureen_US
dc.titleEnergy cost of ambulation in trans-tibial amputees using a dynamic-response foot with hydraulic versus rigid 'ankle': insights from body centre of mass dynamicsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019-02-27
dc.date.application2019-03-14
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0508-x
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-20T11:08:14Z


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