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dc.contributor.authorGiles, S.J.*
dc.contributor.authorParveen, Sahdia*
dc.contributor.authorHernan, A.L.*
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-28T14:27:03Z
dc.date.available2019-02-28T14:27:03Z
dc.date.issued2019-04
dc.identifier.citationGiles SJ, Parveen S and Hernan AL (2019) Validation of the Primary Care Patient Measure of Safety (PC PMOS) questionnaire. BMJ Quality & Safety. 28(5): 389-396.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16865
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground The Primary Care Patient Measure of Safety (PC PMOS) is designed to capture patient feedback about the contributing factors to patient safety incidents in primary care. It required further reliability and validity testing to produce a robust tool intended to improve safety in practice. Method 490 adult patients in nine primary care practices in Greater Manchester, UK, completed the PC PMOS. Practice staff (n = 81) completed a survey on patient safety culture to assess convergent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) assessed the construct validity and internal reliability of the PC PMOS domains and items. A multivariate analysis of variance was conducted to assess discriminant validity, and Spearman correlation was conducted to establish test–retest reliability. Results Initial CFA results showed data did not fit the model well (a chi-square to df ratio (CMIN/DF) = 5.68; goodness-of-fit index (GFI) = 0.61, CFI = 0.57, SRMR = 0.13  and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.10). On the basis of large modification indices (>10), standardised residuals >± 2.58 and assessment of item content; 22 items were removed. This revised nine-factor model (28 items) was found to fit the data satisfactorily (CMIN/DF = 2.51; GFI = 0.87, CFI = 0.91, SRMR = 0.04  and RMSEA = 0.05). New factors demonstrated good internal reliability with average inter-item correlations ranging from 0.20 to 0.70. The PC PMOS demonstrated good discriminant validity between primary care practices (F = 2.64, df = 72, p < 0.001) and showed some association with practice staff safety score (convergent validity) but failed to reach statistical significance (r = −0.64, k = 9, p = 0.06). Conclusion This study led to a reliable and valid 28-item PC PMOS. It could enhance or complement current data collection methods used in primary care to identify and prevent error.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIHR Greater Manchester Patient Safety Translational Research Centre.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2018-007988en_US
dc.rights© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectPrimary Care Patient Measure of Safety (PC PMOS)en_US
dc.subjectPatient feedbacken_US
dc.subjectPatient safetyen_US
dc.subjectPrimary careen_US
dc.titleValidation of the Primary Care Patient Measure of Safety (PC PMOS) questionnaireen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018-09-24
dc.date.application2018-10-18
dc.typeAbstracten_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T14:27:04Z


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