Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAssi, S.*
dc.contributor.authorThomas, J.*
dc.contributor.authorHaffar, Mohamed*
dc.contributor.authorOsselton, D.*
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-07T10:21:49Z
dc.date.available2019-01-07T10:21:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-18
dc.identifier.citationAssi S, Thomas J, Haffar M et al (2016) Exploring Consumer and Patient Knowledge, Behavior, and Attitude Toward Medicinal and Lifestyle Products Purchased From the Internet: A Web-Based Survey. 2(2): e34.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16716
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, lifestyle products have emerged to help improve people’s physical and mental performance. The Internet plays a major role in the spread of these products. However, the literature has reported issues regarding the authenticity of medicines purchased from the Internet and the impact of counterfeit medicines on public health. Little or no data are available on the authenticity of lifestyle products and actual toxicity associated with their use and misuse. Our aim was to investigate consumer and patient attitudes toward the purchase of lifestyle products from the Internet, their knowledge of product authenticity and toxicity, and their experiences with counterfeit lifestyle products. A Web-based study was performed between May 2014 and May 2015. Uniform collection of data was performed through an anonymous online questionnaire. Participants were invited worldwide via email, social media, or personal communication to complete the online questionnaire. A total of 320 participants completed the questionnaire. The results of the questionnaire showed that 208 (65.0%) participants purchased lifestyle products from the Internet mainly due to convenience and reduced cost. More than half (55.6%, 178/320) of participants purchased cosmetic products, whereas only a minority purchased medicinal products. Yet, 62.8% (201/320) of participants were aware of the presence of counterfeit lifestyle products from the Internet, and 11.9% (38/320) experienced counterfeit products. In only 0.9% (3/320) of those cases were counterfeit lifestyle products reported to authorities. Moreover, 7.2% (23/320) of the participants experienced adverse effects due to counterfeit lifestyle products. In summary, patients experienced counterfeit lifestyle products that resulted in adverse effects on their health. Although certain adverse effects were reported in this study, counterfeit products were underreported to authorities. Further public awareness campaigns and patient education are needed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.2196/publichealth.5390en_US
dc.rights(c) 2016 The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the Creative Commons CC-BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)en_US
dc.subjectConsumer knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectAttitudeen_US
dc.subjectBehaviour authenticityen_US
dc.subjectEffectivenessen_US
dc.subjectToxicityen_US
dc.subjectCounterfeiten_US
dc.subjectMedicinal and lifestyle productsen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.titleExploring Consumer and Patient Knowledge, Behavior, and Attitude Toward Medicinal and Lifestyle Products Purchased From the Internet: A Web-Based Surveyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionpublished version paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-01-07T10:21:49Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
assi_et_al_2016.pdf
Size:
680.0Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record