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dc.contributor.authorMcAuley, Colette
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-15T12:19:11Z
dc.date.available2018-11-15T12:19:11Z
dc.date.issued2019-02
dc.identifier.citationMcAuley C (2019) Exploring eleven year old children's understanding of well-being using well-being maps: Commonalities and divergences across areas of varying levels of deprivation and ethnic diversity in an English Qualitative Study. Children and Youth Services Review. 97: 22-29.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16649
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this paper is to explore eleven year old children's understanding of well-being through their completion of Well-Being Maps and subsequent interviews on their content. The children were asked to describe the people, places and things which they viewed as important to their sense of well-being. The subsequent interviews explored their rationalisations for their choices. Ninety-two eleven year old children attending four schools with varying levels of deprivation and ethnic diversity took part in the study. This is the first section of an English study which is a part of the Multi-National Children's Understanding of Well-Being Study involving 26 countries which aims to explore how children conceptualise and experience well-being from a comparative and global perspective. Commonalities and divergences in the English children's responses were explored. Across the entire sample of 92 children, there were clear commonalities. Relationships with family, predominantly parents, were viewed as very important. The reasons provided were consistent love and affection; constant support, encouragement and protection; fun to be with. The duration of this quality of parent-child interaction appeared to be the key. Trust and a sense of security were the result. Relationships with friends were deemed important by over two thirds of the children. The qualities of these relationships mirrored those with the parents with a sense of trust and security being present. Where places and activities were included on their maps, they were often linked to important relationships. Activities appeared to be important in acknowledging the relationship but also maintaining it. Activities were also valued by the children for skill development. There were some differences across the sample with relationships with friends and grandparents being more reported as important in the two areas of high deprivation, irrespective of ethnic diversity. The level of material possessions and holidays abroad were much more frequently reported in the school serving the low deprivation area. At times, the explanations for differences appeared to be an interplay of socio-economic factors and religious and cultural traditions. Suggestions for further research on children's perspectives on factors important to their well-being are made.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHealth Foundation, Englanden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.09.015en_US
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.en_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.subjectWell-being mapsen_US
dc.subjectDeprivationen_US
dc.subjectEthnic diversityen_US
dc.subjectCommonalitiesen_US
dc.subjectRelationshipsen_US
dc.titleExploring eleven year old children's understanding of well-being using well-being maps: Commonalities and divergences across areas of varying levels of deprivation and ethnic diversity in an English Qualitative Studyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018-09-12
dc.date.application2018-09-22
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.EndofEmbargo2020-03-23
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.description.publicnotesThe full-text of this article will be released for public view at the end of the publisher embargo on 23 Mar 2020.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-11-15T12:19:11Z


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