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dc.contributor.authorPower, M.*
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Neil A.*
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, B.*
dc.contributor.authorPickett, K.E.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T15:00:40Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T15:00:40Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationPower M, Small N, Doherty B et al (2018) Hidden hunger? Experiences of food insecurity amongst Pakistani and white British women. British Food Journal. 120(11): 2716-2732.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16592
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Foodbank use in the UK is rising but, despite high levels of poverty, Pakistani women are less likely to use foodbanks than white British women. This study aimed to understand the lived experience of food in the context of poverty amongst Pakistani and white British women in Bradford, including perspectives on food aid. Design: Sixteen Pakistani and white British women, recruited through community initiatives, participated in three focus groups (one interview was also held as a consequence of recruitment difficulties). Each group met for two hours aided by a moderator and professional interpreter. The transcripts were analysed thematically using a three-stage process. Findings: Women in low-income households employed dual strategies to reconcile caring responsibilities and financial obligations: the first sought to make ends meet within household income; the second looked to outside sources of support. There was a reported near absence of food insecurity amongst Pakistani women which could be attributed to support from social/familial networks; resource management within the household; and cultural and religious frameworks. A minority of participants and no Pakistani respondents accessed charitable food aid. There were three reasons for the non-use of food aid: it was not required because of resource management strategies within the household and assistance from familial/social networks; it was avoided out of shame; and knowledge about its existence was poor. Originality: This case study is the first examination of varying experiences of food insecurity amongst UK white British and Pakistani women. Whilst the sample size is small, it presents new evidence on perceptions of food insecurity amongst Pakistani households and on why households of varying ethnicities do not use food aid.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Yorkshire and Humber (NIHR CLAHRC YH)(Grant number IS-CLA-0113-10020); IKnowFood Research Programme at the University of York (https://iknowfood.org/) which is funded through the Global Food Security’s “Resilience of the UK Food System Programme” with support from BBSRC, ESRC, NERC and Scottish Government.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-06-2018-0342
dc.rights© Maddy Power, Neil Small, Bob Doherty and Kate E. Pickett 2018. Published by Emerald Publishing Limited. This article is published under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) licence. Anyone may reproduce, distribute, translate and create derivative works of this article (for both commercial & non-commercial purposes), subject to full attribution to the original publication and authors. The full terms of this licence may be seen at http://creativecommons.org/licences/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.subjectFood insecurityen_US
dc.subjectFood banksen_US
dc.subjectFood aiden_US
dc.subjectEthnicityen_US
dc.subjectPakistanien_US
dc.subjectShameen_US
dc.subjectLived experienceen_US
dc.titleHidden hunger? Experiences of food insecurity amongst Pakistani and white British womenen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018-07-28
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished version paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-05T15:00:44Z


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