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dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Justine*
dc.contributor.authorAzad, Imran*
dc.contributor.authorSaleem, Mohammed Adil*
dc.contributor.authorMedlinskiene, Kristina*
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-13T15:57:39Z
dc.date.available2018-09-13T15:57:39Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationTomlinson J, Azad I, Saleem MA and Medlinskiene K (2018) Exploring digital teaching tools, including the use of social media, to support teaching; perspectives of M.Pharm. students [conference abstract] Pharmacy Education Conference 2018, Manchester, United Kingdom. Pharmacy Education. 18(1): 242. Abstract 30.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16568
dc.description.abstractBackground: The School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of Bradford, is keen to evaluate the potential benefits of digital tools to enhance the teaching and learning of all M.Pharm. students. Students are increasingly using digital technology for both educational and social purposes (Cheston et al., 2013). This project explored the views of pharmacy students about digital technology, including social media, for teaching in the M.Pharm. programme. Method: Convenience sampling was employed to recruit M.Pharm. students for focus groups. Each focus group, facilitated by student researchers with topic guide, was audio-recorded and analysed for themes. Ethics approval was obtained from the University. Results: Year 2 and 3 students from two focus groups (n1=8 (6 male), n2=10 (8 male)) identified three main digital teaching tools used in the current programme: Blackboard, response clickers, and iSTAN. Blackboard, a virtual learning environment, was seen as a hub for holding all required learning materials. However, its use depended on internet access and some felt they would benefit from offline use and improved compatibility with different devices. Audience response systems and a human patient stimulator were well received by students. However, participants strongly felt that they were underutilised. The main benefit of using social media for learning was instant feedback and the encouragement of informal discussions. Participants were not always comfortable posting within the current digital tools used in the programme (e.g. Blackboard) as they felt ‘monitored’. However, participants acknowledged that information obtained through social media might not be as reliable as information from digital tools moderated by academics. Interestingly, participants reported a lack of engagement with programme specific social media pages (e.g. Facebook page). They felt that the information provided was aimed at qualified pharmacists, rather than current students. Conclusion: Participants valued accessibility, flexibility and availability of instant feedback when using digital tools to support their learning. They felt positive about the digital tools used within the programme but emphasised the need of greater integration. References Cheston, C.C., Flickinger, T.E. & Chisom, M.S. (2013). Social media use in medical education: a systematic review. Academic Medicine, 88(6), 893-901en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://pharmacyeducation.fip.org/pharmacyeducation/article/view/675/575en_US
dc.subjectDigital teaching toolsen_US
dc.subjectHigher educationen_US
dc.subjectMPharm (Master of Pharmacy)en_US
dc.subjectSocial mediaen_US
dc.subjectStudent perspectivesen_US
dc.subjectPharmacy educationen_US
dc.titleExploring digital teaching tools, including the use of social media, to support teaching; perspectives of M.Pharm. studentsen_US
dc.status.refereedn/aen_US
dc.typeAbstracten_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-13T15:57:44Z


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