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dc.contributor.authorRahmanian, Nejat*
dc.contributor.authorAqar, D.Y.*
dc.contributor.authorBin Dainure, M.F.*
dc.contributor.authorMujtaba, Iqbal M.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T09:19:18Z
dc.date.available2018-07-31T09:19:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.citationRahmanian N, Aqar DY, Bin Dainure MF et al (2018) Process simulation and assessment of crude oil stabilization unit. Asia-Pacific Journal of Chemical Engineering. 13(4): e2219.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/16518
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractCrude oil is an unrefined petroleum composed of wide range of hydrocarbon up to n‐C40+. However, there are also a percentage of light hydrocarbon components present in the mixture. Therefore, to avoid their flashing for safe storage and transportation, the live crude needs to be stabilized beforehand. This paper aims to find the suitable operating conditions to stabilize an incoming live crude feed to maximum true vapor pressure (TVPs) of 12 psia (82.7 kPa) at Terengganu Crude Oil Terminal, Malaysia. The simulation of the process has been conducted by using Aspen HYSYS. The obtained results illustrate that the simulation data are in good agreement with the plant data and in particular for the heavier hydrocarbons. For the lighter components, the simulation results overpredict the plant data, whereas for the heavier components, this trend is reversed. It was found that at the outlet temperature (85–90°C) of hot oil to crude heat exchanger (HX‐220X), the high‐pressure separator (V‐220 A/B) and the low‐pressure separator (V‐230 A/B) had operating pressures of (400–592 kPa) and (165–186 kPa), respectively, and the live crude was successfully stabilized to a TVP of less than 12 psia. The impact of main variables, that is, inlet feed properties, three‐phase separators operating pressure, and preheater train's performance on the product TVP, are also studied. Based on the scenarios analyzed, it can be concluded that the actual water volume (kbbl/day) has greater impact on the heat exchanger's duty; thus, incoming free water to Terengganu Crude Oil Terminal should be less than 19.5 kbbl/day (9.1 vol%) at the normal incoming crude oil flow rate of 195 (kbbl/day).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights© 2018 Curtin University and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Rahmanian N, Aqar DY, Bin Dainure MF et al (2018) Process simulation and assessment of crude oil stabilization unit. Asia-Pacific Journal of Chemical Engineering. 13(4): e2219, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/apj.2219. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.en_US
dc.subjectAspen HYSYSen_US
dc.subjectCrude oil stabilizationen_US
dc.subjectCrude sweeteningen_US
dc.subjectTAPIS blenden_US
dc.subjectTrue vapor pressureen_US
dc.titleProcess simulation and assessment of crude oil stabilization uniten_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018-06-08
dc.date.application2018-07-05
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/apj.2219
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-31T09:19:23Z


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