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dc.contributor.authorTimmis, Matthew A.
dc.contributor.authorBennett, S.J.
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, John G.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-10T12:58:36Z
dc.date.available2018-05-10T12:58:36Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.citationTimmis MA, Bennett SJ and Buckley JG (2009) Visuomotor control of step descent: evidence of specialised role of the lower visual field. Experimental Brain Research. 195(2): 219-227.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/15846
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractWe often complete step downs in the absence of visual feedback of the lower-limbs, and/or of the area on the ground where we intend to land (e.g. when descending a step whilst carrying a laundry basket). Therefore, the present study examined whether information from lower visual field (lvf) provides any advantage to the control of step descent. Ten healthy subjects (age 24.4 ± 9.4 years) completed repeated step downs over three-step heights with visual information available from either full or upper visual fields (lvf occluded), and for specific intervals relative to step initiation. Visuomotor control of step descent was assessed by determining pre-landing kinematic measures and landing mechanic variables for the initial landing period. Findings indicate that whilst there were only limited effects on pre-landing kinematic measures under lvf occlusion, individual’s ability to plan/control landing mechanics was significantly different in such conditions compared to when they had access to full field vision. These changes were consistent with participants being uncertain regarding precise floor height when access to lvf was restricted, and consequently led them to adapt their landing behaviour but without fundamentally altering their stepping strategy. Compared to when vision was available throughout, the occlusion of vision (full or upper visual field) from toe-off or mid-swing onwards caused very few differences in landing behaviour. This suggests that the contribution of information from lvf to the control of landing behaviour occurs predominantly prior to or during movement initiation and that ‘online’ vision is used only in the latter portion of the descent phase to subtly ‘fine tune’ landings.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-009-1773-xen_US
dc.subjectContinuous visionen_US
dc.subjectLower visual fielden_US
dc.subjectVisuomotoren_US
dc.subjectStep descenten_US
dc.subjectLocomotionen_US
dc.titleVisuomotor control of step descent: evidence of specialised role of the lower visual fielden_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.application2009-03-31
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US


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