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dc.contributor.authorBranney, Peter
dc.contributor.authorWitty, K.
dc.contributor.authorEardley, I.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-17T11:56:43Z
dc.date.available2018-04-17T11:56:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.citationBranney P, Witty K and Eardley I (2014) Psychology, men and cancer. The Psychologist. 27(6): 410-413.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/15520
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractA disease of the anatomical or social body, cancer raises fears about the uncontrollable division and multiplication of some abnormality that will lead ultimately to the destruction of those very conditions that make possible our lives. Cancer incidence and mortality rates are higher in men than women, raising questions about the roles for psychologists in relation to gender and cancer. Psychologists are wont to question the division of population level statistics by sex rather than other, such as behavioural, categories. Conceptual distinctions between biological sex and psychosocial gender are taught early in the psychology curriculum, but cancer of the breast questions the easy separation of the biological body and psychosocial society.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-27/edition-6/psychology-men-and-canceren_US
dc.subjectCancer; Men; Psychology; Masculinityen_US
dc.titlePsychology, men and canceren_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US


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