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dc.contributor.advisorHughes, Peter
dc.contributor.advisorComerford Boyes, Louise
dc.contributor.advisorWalton, Sean
dc.contributor.advisorHartley, Peter
dc.contributor.advisorLindsey, Nigel J.
dc.contributor.authorBinns, Carole L.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T17:01:29Z
dc.date.available2018-02-26T17:01:29Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/15086
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the relatively under-researched experiences of module design of academics employed within one UK university. In all, 96 people responded to an initial e-questionnaire survey, and 23 of these participated in follow-up semi-structured interviews. The qualitative data collected from both sources is the main focus of discussion. The thesis contextualises the research by presenting a brief description of the university of study and a sense of the social and political context of higher education in the few years preceding the onset of the project. Following this, there is a review of the existing literature around module and curriculum design. A separate chapter outlines the mixed methods employed to collect the data and the form of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) used to theme the qualitative data provided by the survey and interviews. The findings supported previous studies, but there was some contradictory data concerning assessment design, the value of the institutional approval procedures, and the usefulness of involving students in the design process. This study found that, as a result of the effect of institutional processes and documents on design, the consequence of changing student profiles (particularly around assessment), and the obligation staff feel to their students (despite their expressed lack of available time and resources), module design (and redesign) is more situation-informed than evidence-informed. It concludes that module designers employ a realistic and pragmatic approach to the process, even when their views, attitudes, and consciences around the rights and wrongs of the design process are sometimes questioned.en
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectAcademic practice; Assessment; Curriculum design; Higher education; Insider research; Interviews; Module design; Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA)en_US
dc.titleThe lived experiences of designing modules at one UK university: a qualitative account of academic practiceen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2015
dc.description.publicnotesThe full text was made available at the end of the embargo, 26th Oct 2020en
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-03T14:47:19Z


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