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dc.contributor.authorMotala, A.*
dc.contributor.authorHeron, James*
dc.contributor.authorMcGraw, Paul V.*
dc.contributor.authorRoach, N.W.*
dc.contributor.authorWhitaker, David J.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T12:49:00Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T12:49:00Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-17
dc.identifier.citationMotala A, Heron J, McGraw PV et al (2018) Rate after-effects fail to transfer crossmodally: evidence for distributed sensory timing mechanisms. Scientific Reports. 8: 924.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/14784
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractAccurate time perception is critical for a number of human behaviours, such as understanding speech and the appreciation of music. However, it remains unresolved whether sensory time perception is mediated by a central timing component regulating all senses, or by a set of distributed mechanisms, each dedicated to a single sensory modality and operating in a largely independent manner. To address this issue, we conducted a range of unimodal and cross-modal rate adaptation experiments, in order to establish the degree of specificity of classical after-effects of sensory adaptation. Adapting to a fast rate of sensory stimulation typically makes a moderate rate appear slower (repulsive after-effect), and vice versa. A central timing hypothesis predicts general transfer of adaptation effects across modalities, whilst distributed mechanisms predict a high degree of sensory selectivity. Rate perception was quantified by a method of temporal reproduction across all combinations of visual, auditory and tactile senses. Robust repulsive after-effects were observed in all unimodal rate conditions, but were not observed for any cross-modal pairings. Our results show that sensory timing abilities are adaptable but, crucially, that this change is modality-specific - an outcome that is consistent with a distributed sensory timing hypothesis.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-19218-zen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectAccurate time perception; Human behaviours; Sensory timing mechanisms; Sensory adaptation; Rate perceptionen_US
dc.titleRate after-effects fail to transfer cross-modally: Evidence for distributed sensory timing mechanismsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2017-12-19
dc.date.application2018-01-17
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-28T02:50:42Z


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