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dc.contributor.authorVowden, Peter*
dc.contributor.authorVowden, Kath*
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-29T12:02:48Z
dc.date.available2018-01-29T12:02:48Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationVowden P and Vowden K (2016) The economic impact of hard-to-heal wounds: promoting practice change to address passivity in wound management. Wounds International. 7(2): 10-15.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/14726
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractAs the prevalence and incidence of wounds are predicted to increase due to an ageing population with increasing comorbidities, reducing the burden of wounds by optimising healing is seen as a key factor in lowering wound care costs. Inappropriate or delayed treatment adversely affects the time to wound healing, impacting quality of life, and increasing the burden on patients, their families and carers, society and the health economy. Identifying non-healing wounds is vital to cost reduction. Failure to recognise wounds not progressing towards healing increases the subsequent risk of non-healing and places the patient at unnecessary increased risk of wound complications.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.woundsinternational.com/journal-content/view/the-economic-impact-of-hard-to-heal-wounds-promoting-practice-change-to-address-passivity-in-wound-managementen_US
dc.subjectBurden; Economic impact; Woundsen_US
dc.titleThe economic impact of hard-to-heal wounds: promoting practice change to address passivity in wound managementen_US
dc.status.refereedNoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US


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