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dc.contributor.authorLightowler, Bryan*
dc.contributor.authorPape, Hilary*
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-18T16:37:31Z
dc.date.available2018-01-18T16:37:31Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.citationLightowler B and Pape H (2017) Dog bite injuries: can the old dog be taught new tricks? British Journal of Healthcare Management. 23(10): 485-491.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/14565
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractDog bite injuries are a common cause of patient presentation to NHS emergency departments (EDs) and minor injuries units, and are generally associated with a low level of acuity, despite an inherent capacity for significant soft tissue damage to be inflicted by canine jaws capable of exerting terrific bite forces. Anatomical sites for injury correlate to victim age, with hand and wrist injuries predominating in the adult population. The most common complication is infection secondary to inoculation of oral flora, with the hands being particularly vulnerable due to their anatomy. Injuries to structures such as tendons can be discreet, and retained foreign bodies can easily be overlooked. Wound care has a propensity to attract a disproportionately high level of malpractice actions, and approaches to the management of dog bite injuries have largely been empirical, which may render the practitioner particularly exposed. In response to increasing pressures on healthcare systems, paramedics with extended scopes of practice, including wound care and suturing, are being utilised to assess, manage, treat, and either refer or discharge patients with apparently minor injuries, in strategies aimed at reducing hospital admissions. This article adopts a case study format to examine and evaluate treatment modalities and the current evidence base informing best practice in terms of dog bite injuries from the perspective of a paramedic practitioner, with critical reflection on the decision making process and complexities of such episodes of care in the pre-hospital setting.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in the British Journal of Healthcare Management, copyright © MA Healthcare, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/bjhc.2017.23.10.485?af=R.en_US
dc.subjectDog bite; Wound; Laceration; Infection; Pre-hospitalen_US
dc.titleDog bite injuries: can the old dog be taught new tricks?en_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2017-09-18
dc.date.application2017-10-11
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.12968/bjhc.2017.23.10.485
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-12T00:00:00Z


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