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dc.contributor.advisorParadkar, Anant R.
dc.contributor.advisorKelly, Adrian L.
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Elaine C.
dc.contributor.authorApshingekar, Prafulla P.
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-08T11:39:10Z
dc.date.available2017-12-08T11:39:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/14127
dc.description.abstractInnovations and process understanding is the current focus in pharmaceutical industry. The objective of this research was to explore application of high power ultrasound in the slurry crystallisation and application of low power ultrasound (3.5 MHz) as process analytical technology (PAT) tool to understand pharmaceutical processing such as hot melt extrusion. The effect of high power ultrasound (20 kHz) on slurry co-crystallisation of caffeine / maleic acid and carbamazepine / saccharin was investigated. To validate low power ultrasound monitoring technique, it was compared with the other techniques (PAT tools) such as in-line rheology and in-line NIR spectroscopy. In-line rheological measurements were used to understand melt flow behaviour of theophylline / Kollidon VA 64 system in the slit die attached to the hot melt extruder. In-line NIR spectroscopic measurements were carried out for monitoring any molecular interactions occurring during extrusion. Physical mixtures and the processed samples obtained from all experiments were characterised using powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning Electron Microscopy, dielectric spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, rotational rheology, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and near infrared spectroscopy. The application of high power ultrasound in slurry co-crystallisation of caffeine / maleic acid helped in reducing equilibrium time required for co-crystal formation. During carbamazepine / saccharin co-crystallisation high power ultrasound induced degradation of carbamazepine was negligible. Low power ultrasound can be used as a PAT tool as it was found to be highly sensitive to the changes in processing temperatures and drug concentration.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectHigh power ultrasound; Co-crystallisation; Process analytical technology; In-line ultrasound monitoring; Pharmaceutical processingen_US
dc.titleApplications of ultrasound in pharmaceutical processing and analytics.en_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentCentre for Pharmaceutical Engineering Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.EndofEmbargo2018-02-20
dc.date.awarded2014
dc.description.publicnotesThe full text will be available at the end of the embargo, 20th Feb 2018en


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