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dc.contributor.authorWaters, Gillian M.*
dc.contributor.authorBeck, S.R.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-30T14:08:38Z
dc.date.available2017-03-30T14:08:38Z
dc.date.issued2012-09
dc.identifier.citationWaters GM and Beck SR (2012) How should we question young children's understanding of aspectuality? British Journal of Developmental Psychology. 30(3): 376–392.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/11740
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractIn two experiments, we investigated whether 4- to 5-year-old children's ability to demonstrate their understanding of aspectuality was influenced by how the test question was phrased. In Experiment 1, 60 children chose whether to look or feel to gain information about a hidden object (identifiable by sight or touch). Test questions referred either to the perceptual aspect of the hidden object (e.g., whether it was red or blue), the modality dimension (e.g., what colour it was), or the object's identity (e.g., which one it was). Children who heard the identity question performed worse than those who heard the aspect or dimension question. Further investigation in Experiment 2 (N= 23) established that children's difficulty with the identity question was not due to a problem recalling the objects. We discuss how the results of these methodological investigations impact on researchers’ assessment of the development of aspectuality understanding.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-835X.2011.02044.xen_US
dc.subjectAspectuality; Knowledge; Children; Communicationen_US
dc.titleHow should we question young children's understanding of aspectuality?en_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.application2012-08-09
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US


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