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dc.contributor.authorAdeka, Muhammad I.*
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Simon J.*
dc.contributor.authorAbd-Alhameed, Raed*
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-27T10:59:05Z
dc.date.available2017-02-27T10:59:05Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-22
dc.identifier.citationAdeka MI, Shepher SJ and Abd-Alhameed R (2013) Resolving the Password Security Purgatory in the Contexts of Technology, Security and Human Factors. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Applications Technology (ICCAT), 20-22 Jan 2013, El Mouradi Palace, Zone Touristique, El Kantaoui, Sousse, Tunisia.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/11480
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPasswords are the most popular and constitute the first line of defence in computer-based security systems; despite the existence of more attack-resistant authentication schemes. In order to enhance password security, it is imperative to strike a balance between having enough rules to maintain good security and not having too many rules that would compel users to take evasive actions which would, in turn, compromise security. It is noted that the human factor is the most critical element in the security system for at least three possible reasons; it is the weakest link, the only factor that exercises initiatives, as well as the factor that transcends all the other elements of the entire system. This illustrates the significance of social engineering in security designs, and the fact that security is indeed a function of both technology and human factors; bearing in mind the fact that there can be no technical hacking in vacuum. This paper examines the current divergence among security engineers as regards the rules governing best practices in the use of passwords: should they be written down or memorized; changed frequently or remain permanent? It also attempts to elucidate the facts surrounding some of the myths associated with computer security. This paper posits that destitution of requisite balance between the factors of technology and factors of humanity is responsible for the purgatory posture of password security related problems. It is thus recommended that, in the handling of password security issues, human factors should be given priority over technological factors. The paper proposes the use of the (k, n)-Threshold Scheme, such as the Shamir’s secret-sharing scheme, to enhance the security of the password repository. This presupposes an inclination towards writing down the password: after all, Diamond, Platinum, Gold and Silver are not memorised; they are stored.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPetroleum Technology Development Funden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights(c) 2013 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.
dc.subjectGuidelinesen_US
dc.subjectInternet
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectHuman factors
dc.subjectComputer crime
dc.subjectPurgatory
dc.subjectTechnology
dc.subjectCryptography
dc.subjectComputer security
dc.subjectSocial engineering
dc.subjectHuman hacking
dc.subjectSocio-cryptanalysis
dc.subjectPassword
dc.subjectPassword repository
dc.titleResolving the Password Security Purgatory in the Contexts of Technology, Security and Human Factorsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeConference paperen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1109/ICCAT.2013.6522044
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-26T09:49:54Z


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