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dc.contributor.authorWeinert, Friedel*
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-25T14:08:51Z
dc.date.available2016-11-25T14:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationWeinart F (2016) The Demons of Science: What They Can and Cannot Tell Us About Our World. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. ISBN 978-3-319-31707-6.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/10688
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractThe title The Demons of Science may at first appear like a contradiction in terms. Demons are associated with the forces of darkness; science represents the power of light. One could assume, therefore, that science has no time for demons. This book aims to destroy this assumption. Science opens its gates to demons as long as they play a rational rather than an evil part. They are put to work. Demons are figures of thought: they belong to the category of thought experiments, which are routinely employed in science and philosophy. As they are cast as agents with superhuman abilities, we may expect that demons provide us with valuable—albeit non-empirical—clues about the constitution of the physical world. But I am interested in exploring not only what the demons tell us but also what they do not tell us about our world. They are cast as superhuman actors but even demons have their limitations. The following chapters contain, I believe, the first systematic study of the role of demons in scientific and philosophical reasoning about the external world.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-319-31708-3en_US
dc.subjectHistorical foundations of physics; Philosophical foundations of physics; Thought experiments; Philosophy of science; Cosmologyen_US
dc.titleThe Demons of Science What They Can and Cannot Tell Us About Our Worlden_US
dc.status.refereedn/aen_US
dc.typeBooken_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US


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