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dc.contributor.authorSchotsmans, Eline M.J.*
dc.contributor.authorDenton, J.*
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Jonathan N.*
dc.contributor.authorJanaway, Robert C.*
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Andrew S.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-23T17:54:34Z
dc.date.available2016-11-23T17:54:34Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationSchotsmans EM, Denton J, Fletcher JN et al (2014) Short-term effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues: Laboratory experiments. Forensic Science International. 238: 142 e1-10.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/10526
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractContradictions and misconceptions regarding the effect of lime on the decay of human remains have demonstrated the need for more research into the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition. This study follows previous research by the authors who have investigated the effect of lime on the decomposition of human remains in burial environments. A further three pig carcasses (Sus scrofa), used as human body analogues, were observed and monitored for 78 days without lime, with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) and with quicklime (CaO) in the taphonomy laboratory at the University of Bradford. The results showed that in the early stages of decay, the unlimed and hydrated lime cadavers follow a similar pattern of changes. In contrast, the application of quicklime instigated an initial acceleration of decay. Microbial investigation demonstrated that the presence of lime does not eliminate all aerobic bacteria. The experiment also suggested that lime functions as a sink, buffering the carbon dioxide evolution. This study complements the field observations. It has implications for the investigation of time since death of limed remains. Knowledge of the effects of lime on decomposition processes is of interest to forensic pathologists, archaeologists, humanitarian organisations and those concerned with disposal of animal carcasses or human remains in mass disasters.
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2013.12.047
dc.subjectAnimals; Body temperature; Calcium compounds; Forensic pathology; Humans; Laboratories; Models; Oxides; Postmortem changes; Skin; Swine; Desiccation; Histology; Lime; Microbiology; Taphonomy; Time since death
dc.titleShort-term effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues: Laboratory experiments
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repository


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