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dc.contributor.authorAstle, A.T.
dc.contributor.authorBlighe, Alan J.
dc.contributor.authorWebb, B.S.
dc.contributor.authorMcGraw, Paul V.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T15:23:30Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T15:23:30Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-25
dc.identifier.citationAstle AT, Blighe AJ, Webb BS and McGraw PV (2015) The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning. Journal of Vision. 15(10): 16, 1-16.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/10321
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Post Doctoral Fellowship awarded to ATA, an Age UK Studentship awarded to AJB, and a Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellowship awarded to BSW. This article presents independent research funded by the NIHR.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1167/15.10.16en_US
dc.rights© 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).en_US
dc.subjectPerceptual learning; Aging; Age-related macular degeneration; Readingen_US
dc.titleThe effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learningen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-26T09:51:35Z


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