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dc.contributor.authorGove, Dianne M.*
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Neil A.*
dc.contributor.authorDowns, Murna G.*
dc.contributor.authorVernooij-Dassen, M.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-26T08:45:08Z
dc.date.available2016-10-26T08:45:08Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationGove D, Small NA, Downs MG and Vernooij-Dassen M (2017) General practitioners' perceptions of the stigma of dementia and the role of reciprocity. Dementia. 16(7): 948-964.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/10074
dc.descriptionYes
dc.description.abstractA qualitative exploration of the stigma of dementia reported that GPs described lack of reciprocity as one way in which people with dementia are perceived within society. This was closely linked to their perception of dementia as a stigma. In this paper, we explore whether GPs perceive people with dementia as lacking reciprocity and, so, if this is linked with societal opinions about dementia as a stigma. The implications of both perceptions of people with dementia failing to reciprocate and of stigma for timely diagnosis are explored. GPs’ perceptions of societal views of people with dementia included a perception of a lack of reciprocity. Specifically, an absence of reciprocity was linked with; failing to respond to human contact, the absence of an appropriate return on social investment and failing to contribute to, or being a burden to, society. GPs reported a link between societal perceptions of lack of reciprocity and stereotypes about advanced dementia, difficulties communicating with people with dementia and lack of opportunities for people with dementia to reciprocate. GPs occupy a key position, they can challenge stereotypes and, with support and targeted training about communicating with people living with dementia, can emphasise the ways in which people with dementia can communicate, thereby enhancing their potential to reciprocate. Such changes have implications for improved care and quality of life through the continued maintenance of social inclusion and perceptions of personhood.
dc.description.sponsorshipnone
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors. Full-text reproduced in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy.
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectReciprocity
dc.subjectStigma
dc.subjectGeneral practitioners
dc.subjectPerceptions
dc.titleGeneral Practitioners' perceptions of the stigma of dementia and the role of reciprocity
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.date.application2016-01-11
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscript
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1471301215625657
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-27T01:38:49Z


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